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1. Why Do We Need Self-Organizing Teams?

The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams”, the Agile Manifesto announces. This raises a few questions: What are self-organizing teams? Why do we need them? What difference do self-organizing teams make? How can we support self-organisation? Could there be any way to help this special kind of teamwork to emerge?

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As a tester you are often placed in many difficult situations. You act as the gatekeeper between your company and your consumers, which can create a lot of pressure. You are after all the person who must tell the team, “No, we can’t put the app into production because it can’t handle the load.” And who wants to hear the word “No?”

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1. Removing “Test” in Testing Automation

Like many technologies, test automation comes with a lot of promise about what can “easily” be done. These tools generally take more effort than guaranteed during the sales presentation and typically yield less than desirable results, considering the time invested. The biggest reason for this problem is the disparity between what we’re told to use these tools for versus what their true capabilities are.

This is a perception I’d like to change.

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1. How the Testing Community Can Work for You

When I first started testing I wasn’t happy. I was writing automation code and running test scripts without any sophisticated tools. This was okay, but it wasn’t interesting. I went to a Software Testing Club meeting where, out of the blue, James Bach was there and he stood up and talked a fair amount of sense at me. I went home and looked him up. The rest is a long story of interesting work, learning, engagement and community that makes me glad of my job every day. I write occasional blog posts, I chat on twitter and forums, and none of this is a chore… and best of all I started to see all sorts of benefits to my interaction with the community – and I hope that you’ll get involved too!

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When you mention “testing in production” you might recall the days when developers snuck releases past the QA team in hopes of keeping the application up to date, but in reality it only caused a buggy mess. And users were the ones who suffered. For this reason, most businesses avoid testing in production altogether because it’s too risky for the end user.

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