Image source: mmhsthompson.wordpress.com

1. Continuous Quality: What DevOps Means for QA

From Continuous Integration to Continuous Quality.

Here’s a great slideshow about the impact that DevOps has on QA. The author is Jeff Sussna, a long-time consultant who helps lots of organizations pull their Development, QA, and Operations teams closer together.

Jeff talks about creating a service delivery machine, and how teams need to build quality into the system. Testers move from being bug-finders to being quality advocates. Testing happens all the time, and QA acts as a mirror to the organization.

, , ,

In a traditional software engineering organization, the QA group is often seen as separate from the Development group. Developers and testers have different roles, different responsibilities, different job descriptions, and different management. They are two distinct entities.

However, for folks outside the engineering team – say in Operations – they generally consider Development and QA to be in the same group. From this perspective those teams are working together to do a single job, with a single responsibility: deliver a product that works.

, ,

Image source: www.youtube.com

1. Mobile Testing: How to Maintain Your Devices

Mobile testing is such an important part of testing today, and something we at Neotys take very seriously. That’s why this blog post caught our eye.

Maintaining the devices that your company provides for testing mobile applications is mandatory for the success of your mobile development projects. It is as important as the human resources of the company. Since modern emulation tools and cloud services don’t assure high quality of mobile applications, all portable devices such as smartphones and tablets should be maintained properly.

, , ,

Image source: www.delzer.com

1. Why Can’t They Just Get It Right?

There are lots of great ideas about testing. But there are also some silly ideas out there – how to do as little of it as possible, or not to do it at all. In this blog post, the author discusses three main categories:

  1. Don’t do product testing at all – just get it done right in the first place
  2. Don’t do product testing at all if you tested the components
, , ,

Image source: www.eff.org

When it comes to making sure that your website is up, serving customers, and meeting its performance expectations, there are quite a few tools available to help. One of the most common solutions for Application Performance Monitoring (APM) is called RUM, or Real User Monitoring.

RUM products can be simple and free – as anyone with a Google Analytics account can tell you – but they can also be quite sophisticated. Powerful RUM suites incorporate code-level diagnostics and browser-based agents to comprehensively trace every visitor’s experience through your system. As soon as someone experiences a problem – BOOM – that’s when the alarm goes off.

, , ,