Image source: imagemilestone.com

1. Hands-On Mobile App Testing is available

Mobile testing is important to us here at Neotys. So we wanted to pass along information about this new book, Hands-On Mobile App Testing, aimed at anyone interested in mobile apps and mobile testing, ranging from junior to expert mobile testers who are already involved in mobile development teams. This book is also ideal for software test managers who need to manage mobile testing teams or to select a mobile test strategy. It’s also great for software testers who are new to this topic and want to switch to mobile technologies.

, , ,

Ever notice how software development projects seem to slow down when you add more people?

Books have been written about how difficult it can be to manage a large software project. It’s probably one of the only manufacturing disciplines where adding people and layers of project management makes it more difficult to estimate the timeline and quality of the final output.

, , ,

Image source: attractionmarketingfornewbies.com

1. 2 days, 200 customers, And Conclusive Results: The New User Testing

At Neotys we consistently stress the importance of testing from end user’s point of view. This article from Atlassian is about something bold they tried at their user conference, called Summit, this past September. The company is constantly trying new methods to understand their customers, and learning what they can do better. At Summit, they reached out to customers in a new way: the Test Lab.

, , , ,

Image source: seedbox.com

1. Do You Need a Transition Team?

Ever the experts, the group at Scrum, Inc. recently assessed a young Scrum implementation and their observations led to a lot of discussion around the office. They saw excited teams, a stable cadence of meetings, and leadership eager to support the implementation — in other words, a very promising start. Yet the teams had hit a wall and the organization was struggling to understand why.

, , ,

Image source: comstoroutdoor.com

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet. So said Shakespeare’s Juliet, convincing herself that Romeo was a great guy, even if his business card had “Montague” on it. Her point is well-taken. What matters are a thing’s inherent qualities, not what it’s called.

However, sometimes the opposite happens – two names that have different meanings merge together over time, making the differences between them fuzzy and unclear. When that happens, we lose perspective about what it means to be one thing or the other.

, , ,